The Perseid meteor shower and Pluto are the two subjects that will highlight the schedule at the University of Wyoming Harry C. Vaughan Planetarium during August.

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The Perseids are a prolific meteor shower associated with the comet Swift-Tuttle.

In August 2006, Pluto was reclassified from a planet to a dwarf planet. The reclassification was triggered by the discovery of many additional objects (the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt) out beyond the orbit of Neptune.

A film and a special live talk for audiences will be featured each week.

To get tickets or receive more information about programs, email planetarium@uwyo.edu or call (307) 766-6506.

Tickets are $5 for the public and $3 for students, senior citizens, veterans, first responders, and those under 18. Seating is free for children under 5.

The August schedule is as follows:

  • “From Earth to the Universe,” Saturday, August 7, 2 pm. This 30-minute voyage takes the audience out to the colorful birthplaces and burial grounds of stars, and farther out beyond the Milky Way to the unimaginable immensity of myriad galaxies.
  • “Wyoming Skies -- Perseid Special,” Friday, August 13, 7 pm. This program provides an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers, and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season, wish a special focus of Perseid.
  • “Hot and Energetic Universe,” Saturday, August 14, 2 pm. High-energy astrophysics plays a key role in understanding the universe.
  • “Exploration of Jupiter,” Friday, August 20, 7 pm. As the most massive object besides the sun in the solar system, Jupiter is a necessary drive-by for every mission to the outer solar system.
  • Full-dome movie: “Mayan Archaeoastronomy: Observers of the Universe,” Saturday, August 21, 2 pm. This film tours six Mayan temples: San Gervasio, Chichen Itzá, Uxmal, Edzná, Palenque and Bonampak.
  • “Wyoming Skies,” Tuesday, August 24, 7 pm. This program provides an exploration of the stars, constellations, planets, meteor showers, and other celestial phenomena visible from Wyoming for the season.
  • “Pluto and the Kuiper Belt,” Friday, August 27, 7 p.m. Audience members can learn why Pluto was demoted and observe the data and discoveries of the New Horizons mission to the farthest reaches of our solar system.
  • Full-dome movie: “The Sun: Our Living Star,” Saturday, August 28, 2 pm. Viewers will discover the secrets of the sun and experience never-before-seen images of its violent surface in immersive full-dome format.

All programs are approximately an hour in length.

If you have a group larger than six, it is recommended to contact the planetarium for a private show here.

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