In response to the ruling by US District Court Judge Amy Berman Jackson placing the gray wolves back under the protection of the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Governor Mead signed and filed an emergency rule establishing that Wyoming’s commitment under its management plan is legally enforceable.

At issue in the judge’s ruling is Wyoming’s promise to maintain more than the required 100 wolves and 10 breeding pairs outside the national parks. Wyoming put an addendum in its management plan that it would maintain a buffer of wolves above the required number. It did not specify how many or make the buffer binding by law.

The emergency rule the state filed Wednesday changes that addendum and turns it into a regulation. The governor said the emergency rule has the full force and effect of law immediately and is effective for 120 days or 240 if extended by the Governor.

The Wyoming Game and Fish Commission initiated the formal rulemaking process set forth in the Administrative Procedures Act that will make this emergency rule permanent. The Commission expects to complete the process in November.

The Wyoming Attorney General also filed a motion with the US District Court asking the Court to recognize Wyoming's management commitments are legally enforceable.

“Now that Wyoming has resolved the Court’s concern, I hope the Court will amend its ruling and allow Wyoming’s continued management of gray wolves,” Governor Mead said.